The iPhone 7 Offers Brilliant Display Despite Using Old LCD Tech

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The iPhone 7 Offers Brilliant Display Despite Using Old LCD Tech

The iPhone 7 Offers Brilliant Display Despite Using Old LCD Tech

You might use the proverb ‘old champagne in a new bottle’ for iPhone 7, but that may not be much justified for all the features of the latest smartphone. For instance, iPhone 7 has substantially improved its display despite sticking to the LCD, a technology that’s gradually becoming obsolete and every other flagship has left behind.

The Galaxy S7 and Note 7. The Nexus 6P. The Moto Z. The LG G5. The OnePlus 3. Take any high-end smartphone, and what you see on the front isn’t LCD, like the iPhone 7. It’s OLED(or AMOLED, which is similar enough for our purposes that we’ll conflate the two). There’s good reason for that, says Ray Soneira, president of DisplayMate Technologies.

“[OLEDs are] much thinner, much lighter, with a much smaller bezel providing a near rimless design, they can be made flexible and into curved screens,” writes Soneira in a post analyzing the iPhone 7’s display prowess. “Plus they have a very fast response time, better viewing angles, and an always-on display mode.”

That may seem like an odd thing to write in the context of extolling the LCD iPhone’s virtues. But the iPhone 7 lacking those attributes makes its performance all the more impressive.

Apple’s latest smartphone may look like the two that came before it, but its display is one of the components that has leveled up considerably. Soneira found that it beat its forbearer in basically every measurable regard. It also beats out smartphone displays of any stripe for important attributes like peak brightness and highest absolute color accuracy.

It’s not necessarily the best display overall; the Galaxy 7 was DisplayMate’s pick for best OLED display, and choosing a winner amounts to a toss-up. “They are both great state-of-the-art displays,” says Soneira. “But OLEDs and LCDs have different inherent native strengths and weaknesses, so neither display wins in all display performance categories.”

What’s intriguing is that the iPhone 7 comes close at all, given just how many strengths OLED has. In addition to the attributes Soneira named above, OLED can also be more power-efficient, as it requires enough juice to light only the individual pixels that need it, as opposed to LCD, which depends on a single backlight to fire up your display.

So how did Apple do it? Color, for one. It’s one of just three smartphone manufacturers to support the new DCI-P3 wide color gamut that’s used in 4K televisions. The other two are Samsung and LG, two companies that also happen to make 4K televisions. On a smartphone-sized screen, rich, accurate color representation matters to your eyes more than the number of pixels you can squeeze in.

“Since the iPhone 7 has a Retina display it doesn’t need the 4K resolution,” says Soneira. “It already appears perfectly sharp at its normal viewing distances.”

The only downside is that it looks as though Apple may have hit the limits of what it can accomplish with LCD in a smartphone. In fact, despite being largely the same technology, the iPhone 7 display falls short of the killer iPad Pro’s because smartphones don’t play as nice with the tablet’s scratch-friendly anti-reflective coating. An LCD display can also never curve, or flex, or offer quite the same efficiency as its OLED counterpart, no matter how advanced it gets.

That explains, at least in part,reports that Apple will be shifting to OLED next year—supplied at least in part by LG and Samsung—in at least one model. The iPhone may be the best LCD smartphone display out there, but there’s not much competition for the title. Everyone else has already moved on to what’s next.

Topic Credit: Wired.com


iPhone 7 Got Lower Response at Start Up than iPhone 6

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New iPhone 7 Got Lower Response than iPhone 6 on the Web

New iPhone 7 Got Lower Response than iPhone 6 on the Web

For all the buzz the iPhone 7 and its lack of a headphone jack generated in the last couple weeks, it looks like it did not quite measure up to its predecessor’s popularity.

According to data from digital intelligence provider SimilarWeb, the release of the newest smartphone from Apple “failed to match the traffic peak of the iPhone 6 launch.” Despite the iPhone 7’s release made for a 152 percent spike in one-day worldwide traffic to Apple’s online home  — and represented the biggest online traffic in two years of launches —  it looks as though the public was more jazzed about the iPhone 6 than the iPhone 7, all things considered.

In conducting their analysis, SimilarWeb analyzed surges of traffic to Apple during the last four iPhone launches — the iPhone 7, iPhone SE, iPhone 6S, and iPhone 6. The company measured worldwide visits via desktop, and while Apple may be known for its mobile devices, desktop visits still comprised about two-thirds of worldwide traffic to the site.

When the iPhone 7 was unveiled, worldwide visits to Apple’s homepage shot up from 13 million desktop hits on September 6 to 32.8 million visits worldwide on its launch date, September 7. The U.S. alone saw a jump from 3.8 million on September 6 to 9.4 million the next day, a 147 percent one-day rise in traffic.

But as impressive as those numbers sound, it is not quite at the same level as Apple achieved back in 2014. Two years ago, Apple saw a 195 percent increase in one-day worldwide traffic when compared to the previous day, with more visits overall. On September 8, 2014, Apple saw 17.49 million visits, but on the September 9 launch day, this figure shot up to 51.5 million visits. In the U.S, SimilarWeb found a similar story — hits increased from 6.2 million before launch to 19.9 million on the day of launch, representing a 219 percent one-day increase. the iPhone 7 launch has certainly proven far more popular than the most recent previous launch of the iPhone SE. When that phone was unveiled on March 21, there was only an 85 percent rise in one-day worldwide visits.

The iPhone 7 launch has proven more popular than the most recent previous launch of the iPhone SE. When that phone was unveiled on March 21, there was only an 85 percent rise in one-day worldwide visits.

But if rumors are to be believed, everything will pale in comparison to Apple’s next big iPhone launch, which will celebrate the 10th anniversary of the phone. So stay tuned.

Source: digitaltrends


Report claims Apple is testing a 65-inch iTV

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Report claims Apple is testing a 65-inch iTV

Report claims Apple is testing a 65-inch iTV

If rumors and reports from Apple analysts are to be believed, Apple has been on the verge of launching an own-brand television for several years now. Of course, the company has yet to release anything or even hint that it might be working on an HDTV product. That didn’t stop analysts at IBK Securities from fanning the flames once again with a new claim on Sunday that Apple is currently testing a 65-inch OLED panel for possible inclusion in an “iTV.”

The Korea Herald on Sunday relayed IBK’s note to clients, which stated that a local South Korean display panel maker has been tasked with a limited run of 65-inch OLED HDTV screens for Apple. The Cupertino-based giant is reportedly testing the screens for its iTV product, which Apple supposedly hopes to launch sometime next year.

No other details were provided in the report.

Whether or not Apple will ever launch an own-brand television remains to be seen, but Apple fans looking for a better living room experience will likely get one long before any “iTV” becomes a reality. Recent reports from more reliable sources recently stated that Apple is planning to launch a revamped Apple TV with support for third-party apps and games.

 


Apple Confirms the dates for Worldwide Developers Conference 2014

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Apple Confirms the dates for Worldwide Developers Conference 2014

Apple Confirms the dates for Worldwide Developers Conference 2014

Apple has confirmed dates for its Worldwide Developers Conference, WWDC 2014, which will take place June 2th through June 6th in San Francisco, along with news of a new ticket application process aiming to cut out some of the mad rush for access. Registration for WWDC is already open, but for 2014 it’s no longer a first-come, first-served process.

Instead, Apple will be offering ticket applications through until Monday, April 7th, at 10am PT. After that, Apple will be randomly selecting those five thousand whose applications are successful, at which point they’ll need to cough up the $1,599 attendance costs.

Interestingly, Apple is limiting access to existing registered developers. Would-be WWDC attendees will need to be registered on the iOS Developer Program, iOS Developer Enterprise Program, or Mac Developer Program as of the announcement of the dates today.

Although targeting coders for the most part, with several days of access to Apple engineers, WWDC is also traditionally an opportunity to see a preview of what the company has in the pipeline for its software. In the past that’s included new versions of Mac OS X and iPhone iOS, with the big news generally coming in the day-one keynote.

With iOS 8 expected later this year, alongside the iPhone 6, a glimpse of the new mobile software seems almost guaranteed. We’ll know more in a few months time.

From SlashGear