Australian Universities to get Box Cloud Service

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Australian Universities to get Box Cloud Service

Australian Universities to get Box Cloud Service

Cloud service provider Box is coming to the Australian tertiary sector after Australia’s Academic and Research Network (AARN) announced it will deploy the service across its client base, with trials already underway.

Box, already in use at a number of prestigious universities in the United States including Stanford, University of California, Cornell and Carnegie Mellon, is a cloud-based collaborative data storage service that allows academics, staff and students to share and manage content on any device.

Trials of the service are already underway at Edith Cowan University, Charles Sturt University, Southern Cross University, University of South Australia, University of Adelaide, Queensland University of Technology, Holmesglen TAFE and Newington College.

AARNEt, a not-for-profit organisation that provides internet and communications services to the educational sector, said the trials would allow the service to be customised to meet the needs of the Australian market.

“Our customers have been asking for a secure, scalable and affordable service packed with features that helps students, faculty and staff share and manage content from anywhere, anytime, on any device and we’re pleased to now offer them Box as a solution,” AARNet CEO Chris Hancock said.

 


Optus under Ruling by Court for Its Confusing Claim

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Optus under Ruling by Court for Its Confusing Claim

Optus under Ruling by Court for Its Confusing Claim

OPTUS has been ordered to write letters to new customers and offer them penalty-free exits from mobile phone contracts as part of a Victorian Supreme Court ruling that found the telco had misled the public about the coverage of its mobile network.

The ruling comes after Telstra last month won a court battle against rival Optus over a series of “misleading” online and TV ads that claimed there was little difference between the companies’ mobile networks.

From The Australian

 


Contactless NFC Tags Payment System to Come from More Banks in Australia by this Year

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Contactless NFC Tags Payment System to Come from More Banks in Australia by this Year

Contactless NFC Tags Payment System to Come from More Banks in Australia by this Year

With the Commonwealth Bank announcing it will support NFC tags that enable contactless payments, smaller banks have now revealed that they too are completing trials and plan to expand by the end of the year.

Cuscal and bankmecu are nearing the end of a trial of near-field communication (NFC) tags backed by Visa payWave technology.

The tags attach to the back of a mobile phone and are linked to existing Visa accounts. They are similar to the tags recently rolled out by the Commonwealth Bank and Coles for MasterCard’s Pay Tag technology.

The trial has been running since September, and Cuscal customer bankmecu expects to extend this to its customer base over the next few months.

“With this pilot now successfully complete, we are excited to be able to support our mutual sector clients to extend this novel mobile payment solution to their 2 million collective cardholders,” Cuscal general manager of product and service Adrian Lovney said in a statement.

Other Cuscal customers seeking to implement the technology include People’s Choice Credit Union.

“Many of our clients, including bankmecu, are intent on rolling this out to their cardholders in the coming months, potentially even before Christmas,” Lovney said.

Source ZDNet

 


Optus to Refund $9m to 235,000 Customers

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Optus to Refund $9m to 235,000 Customers

OPTUS will return nearly $9m to hundreds of thousands of mobile phone customers who were billed for a service they didn’t request. Over a period stretching more than two years, the telco charged around 235,000 postpaid mobile and small business customers for SurePage, despite the customers not asking for it.

The service is a voicemail alternative, which diverts unanswered calls to an operator, who relays a message via SMS. Users are charged $1.20 each time the operator takes a call, according to Optus’s website.

The telco blamed the mistake on a software coding error in its billing system, which was fixed in September.

“Optus apologises to all customers who have been affected by this mistake,” said Optus CEO, Consumer Australia, Kevin Russell, in a statement on Friday.

The telco said it will provide a full refund to affected customers.

An Optus spokeswoman says about 30,000 customers will receive a refund of more than $100. A further 30,000 will receive $50-$100, with the remaining 175,000 receiving under $50, she said.

The telco is anticipating an overall cost of $8.8 million.

Affected customers will receive a letter in the coming weeks.

Source: news australia